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Crueler than COVID: Forcing the sick and elderly to die alone

Empower Wisconsin | Nov. 25, 2020

By Margot Cleveland, The Federalist 

One year ago today, my father died following a 10-year battle with cancer. Our family’s final weeks with him likely mirrored those of many other families. With a new wave of COVID-19 lockdowns beginning, however, I feel compelled to share our story because that journey convinces me that we, as a nation, are subjecting the dying to physical and psychological torture in the name of fighting a pandemic.

I’m not sure when my father was first diagnosed with cancer because he didn’t tell anyone. He didn’t need to at the time because his cancer, called myelofibrosis, is a slow-progressing kind that can go without symptoms for years. Likely caused by his 30-some years spent in a garage teaching young adults auto mechanics at a technical college, this rare blood cancer finally advanced enough about five years ago to force my parents to move to a senior facility a mile from my older brother’s home.

Until about three months before my father’s death, my parents lived there self-sufficiently. My father kept his cancer at bay with oral chemotherapy while he cared full time for my mother, who has dementia. After my father received a second diagnosis of advanced prostate cancer, however, my brother convinced them to move in with his family. Even then, my father maintained he was going to survive my mom by one day so he could care for her.

About this time, I began traveling back and forth every weekend to spend time with my parents, to help with the move, and to give my brother a respite. My parents were barely settled with my brother’s family when my dad couldn’t eat without agonizing pain. He was hospitalized with a severe thrush infection of the esophagus, the oral chemotherapy ceased, and he began needing more frequent blood transfusions.

For two weeks, it seemed possible he might recover. If he could overcome the thrush infection, he could begin his chemotherapy again. During those weeks, my brother and I cared for my father in the hospital, spoon-feeding him the soft hospital foods, holding his glass to his mouth, placing the straw between his dried lips, helping him to the bathroom when he could walk or changing and cleaning him when he couldn’t, and wetting his lips and mouth with a water-soaked sponge as he slept. When he struggled to breathe — he had asthma as well — we were there to help with his inhaler, to call respiratory therapy, or just to hold his hand and speak words or prayers of comfort.

My father spent his final days in hospice. When I arrived one Saturday morning, my brother said my father had been unconscious since late Friday, but a couple of hours later, when the nurse came to change the bedding, the shifting made him moan. “Daddy, Daddy, I love you,” I said loudly, again and again, while holding his hand and looking for his eyes. They opened briefly, and he looked into mine as his lips moved slowly, forming what would be his final words: “I love you.”

When COVID-19 hit in early 2020, these events were still fresh in my mind, and I thanked God then that my father’s death was not a few months later. Too many families have faced death and dying this year under pandemic restrictions, and we are now en route to a repeat, limiting hospital visitors and banning funerals.

The reality, though, is that these restrictions are not saving those with terminal diseases. Instead, they’re torturing the sick, physically, emotionally, and spiritually. No loved ones are beside the sufferers to quench their thirst, hold their hands, forgive their pasts, or pray with them, and there are no priests with sacraments.

Imagine the agony of a father or mother seeking healing and forgiveness from an estranged child before death. Think of the sick or elderly racked with guilt and unable to secure a final penance. 

Such emotional agony might well pale the physical suffering the dying endure without a constant bedside caregiver who can hear the moan, see the grimace, and witness the struggled gasps for air. Even the kindest and most skilled medical professionals cannot provide the comfort a loved one can.

Those imposing heavy-handed coronavirus rules must realize the truth: Restricting access to the dying is cruel. Keeping people from their suffering loved ones does not safeguard them. It merely subjects them to a different kind of suffering — one for which there might be no recovery.

Read more at The Federalist 

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2 thoughts on “Crueler than COVID: Forcing the sick and elderly to die alone

  • This very subject pisses me off so much I am almost at the point I can’t speak to my son. So worried about “oh no I might die” when ACTUAL PEOPLE like grandma (who is 81) will die alone because you are too flipping paranoid and selfish to get out of your house and hold her hand after all she’s done for you. But yeah, let’s help STRANGERS not get Covid by wearing a stupid mask. That’s the morally superior thing to do. Not going to see your family.

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